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Hello,

what is the function of the clip indicator ?

I was using the elephant2 in clip mode and could overload it very shortly,without clip indicator giving any counts, but with audible short clipping (about 5 to 6 samples).

Also clipping was almost identical to just overloading my DAW.

Yannick


Clip indicator is useful with EL-1, AIGC-1 and AIGC-2 modes.  For other modes it is not useful.

The 'Clip' mode is best used with oversampling enabled - this way it will sound much better than a simple overloading.


Thanks.

I did run 4x oversampled - on a clarinet my DAW clipping sounds just slightly worse than the Elephant2.

I must add the Soundscape DAW has had quite benign (and sometimes useful) digital clipping since '93 ...

So we turned to EL-2 mode which caught the 1-2 dB limits quite well.

The noiseshaping seems quite moderate - is it very effective ?  Is there a way to tell which apparant bit depth you get (keep) noiseshaping to 16 bit ?

Yannick


But that's clipping, of course it can be improved only a little.

Yes, noise-shaping is moderate so that it does not add too much oscillation in the higher frequencies.  I believe this noise-shaping is pretty good, sonically.  I have not used any equal-loudness curves since I do not really think they help much.

I think knowing the noise-floor you get is not of much use since the most important thing is how noise-shaping contributes to the final sound clarity.


I know the noisefloor - it shows up on my metering soft ...

I just wondered what the 'relative' bit depth/resolution is when noise shaping to 16 bit.  I've read that we can get around 19 bit out of a 16 bit medium this way.

Yannick


Noise-shaping gives a non-uniform noise-floor boost.  In the case of Elephant it is stronger in the lower frequency end.  Up to 14kHz it gives around 1 bit more resolution, while below 1000 Hz resolution grows exponentially.  It is infinite at DC.  You may observe this yourself with a spectrum analyzer, by dithering a sinewave signal.
This topic was created before release of the latest product version, and it may contain details irrelevant to this version.  Replying is disabled for this topic.