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Forums     Discussions     Announces, Releases and Discussions Voxengo AnSpec analog-style spectrum analyzer plugin released


Voxengo is happy to release its newest free plug-in - AnSpec, analog-style third-octave spectrum analyzer plug-in for professional music production applications.  AnSpec is available in AudioUnit and VST plug-in formats (including native 64-bit support), for Mac OS X (v10.5 and later), and Windows computers.

Voxengo AnSpec 1.0 Screenshot

AnSpec was designed to be a handy visual feedback tool for those who like smoothness and easiness of use of analog analyzers.  AnSpec also provides peak level indication.

While there are no adjustable parameters available in this plug-in, you can still change level meter ballistics and resize plug-in’s window.

AnSpec features:

  • 1/3 octave analog-style spectrum analyzer
  • Peak level indication
  • User interface window resizing
  • Stereo and mono analysis
  • All sample rates support
  • Zero processing latency

AnSpec can be downloaded freely at the Voxengo web site: https://www.voxengo.com/product/anspec/


This is just a reflection, not a "review":

I wish I'd given it more time to learn to use this kind of spectrum analyzer, because I simply don't know what it's supposed to tell (and now I'm almost too old ;)).  For instance, I ran White Noise through a brutal (lots of dBs/octave) HP @ 10kHz.  SPAN does not show any info what so ever below 10kHz, while AnSpec indicates energy from 25Hz all the way up to 10kHz+.


Such analyzers simply can't display steep changes in spectrum power.

Thanks, Aleksey!

But, what are they good for, then?  I mean, when should/would one choose AnSpec over – for instance – SPAN?


It's your choice.  I guess AnSpec may be good for master or sub-mix channel monitoring.

A lot of mastering studios have these kind of meters simply to get a quick overall view of the general spectrum of a track.  Usually looking at extreme details is not always desirable and can be quite distracting.

I guess in the end it's a matter of taste and what one is used to.  It's also worth mentioning that "learning", or getting used to, these tools takes quite a lot of time.  You just have to work with them for a few months on many different mixes and it'll suddenly start making sense.

Cheers!


@ bmaniac ("It's also worth mentioning that "learning", or getting used to, these tools takes quite a lot of time.  You just have to work with them for a few months on many different mixes and it'll suddenly start making sense.")

Tell me about it!  I've been "learning" for almost ten years now ;)

I sometimes used this kind of metering way back with Samplitude (included) but was confused (even then) when it indicated frequencies that wasn't there.  I always found SPAN-like tools more useful.

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