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As a recent Polysquasher customer, I could use some clarification about the "Dry Mix" control, and how it can be used for Parallel Compression.

To me, the whole point of Parallel Compression is to bring up the level of quieter sections of program material, while at the same time allowing the loud sections and peaks to play through uncompressed, masking any audible compression artifacts occurring in the periods of increased gain reduction activity when there is a higher signal level.  In short, "bottom-up" dynamic range compression: quiet stuff made louder, peaks left alone.  The whole process hinges on being able to increase the level of the compressed signal independently of the un-compressed component.

I understand that the "Dry Mix" control will allow the mixture of compressed and uncompressed program material, but is there any "make-up" gain applied to the compressed component?  If there is not, isn't mixing the two signals just the same as reducing the compression ratio over all?  For example, if the ratio is set at 2:1, and the Dry Mix is set to 50%, is that not the same as setting a ratio of 1.5:1 with a Dry Mix of 0%?  I still need to bring up the level of the compressed component to bring the "bottom" up.

Does the "Out Gain" control on the main panel only raise the level of the compressed component, leaving the "Dry" component at its original level?  I guess I could use some clarification as to where exactly in the signal chain the Out Gain is applied - if it's after the Dry Mix combining, aren't we simply reducing the compression ratio?

Frank Lockwood

Lockwood ARS - http://LockwoodARS.com

Quality music recording services for classical and acoustic music.

Toronto, ON, Canada

Host DAW: Merging Technologies' Pyramix 11.0.4 (64 bit) AND 9.1.10 (32 bit)

System: Windows 7 SP1 64 bit on Mac Mini (6.2) via Bootcamp 5.1.5621

Windows 7 SP1 32 bit on MacBook Pro (3.1) computer via Bootcamp 4.0.4033.

Curve EQ, Deft Compressor, Elephant, GlissEQ, HarmoniEQ, LF Max Punch, Polysquasher2, Polysquasher3, Soniformer, TransGainer, Voxformer; also Deconvolver.


Parallel compression is not the same thing as "upward compression" you are talking about.  Polysquasher can't perform upward compression.

You are correct, Dry Mix is similar to the Ratio control - that's why I tend to not include it if a Ratio control is available in the plug-in.  They are different in that the Dry Mix parameter interacts with compressor's release stage while the Ratio control does not.


I guess, then, that my only option for creating upward compression is to run my signal through two mixer strips in my DAW - one with Polysquasher installed, and the other without (assuming that Pyramix's automatic latency delay compensation is working properly - otherwise I'll have to install a second instance of Polysquasher on the second strip, with a 1:1 ratio and a threshold of 0 dBFS).  This would also provide the answer for the same question for Soniformer.

Just out of curiosity, Aleksey, how do you distinguish between Parallel and Upward compression?  What are your definitions?

By the way, I'm currently mixing a CD of Gregorian Chant sung by a six voice female chorus.  These ladies have managed to cause distortion in just about every other plug-in compressor I've tried, but with Elephant and Polysquasher, things are very smooth, and sound great.  Thanks for the wonderful tools.

Frank Lockwood

Lockwood ARS - http://LockwoodARS.com

Quality music recording services for classical and acoustic music.

Toronto, ON, Canada

Host DAW: Merging Technologies' Pyramix 11.0.4 (64 bit) AND 9.1.10 (32 bit)

System: Windows 7 SP1 64 bit on Mac Mini (6.2) via Bootcamp 5.1.5621

Windows 7 SP1 32 bit on MacBook Pro (3.1) computer via Bootcamp 4.0.4033.

Curve EQ, Deft Compressor, Elephant, GlissEQ, HarmoniEQ, LF Max Punch, Polysquasher2, Polysquasher3, Soniformer, TransGainer, Voxformer; also Deconvolver.

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