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Hi All,

I am trying a demo of CurveEQ.  Great plug-in!  Thanks Aleksey!  Only one question.  I used to use an analizer which had a linear response for a pink noise.  CurveEQ has a linear response for a white noise which is far from a real mixes we have in studio.  Wouldn't it be better to add '+3db' correction as one more option somewhere under '?' button?  I agree that using the pink noise curve as a reference isn't an ideal, either, perhaps a brown noise' curve is more suitable solution for modern music, but anyway...  How are you guys using it?

BTW What kind of curve does Sonic Finalizer use as 'linear'?

Thanks.

Vitaly.


Vitaly, I guess, you are speaking about lin/log scales.  CurveEQ uses log scale which is the most suitable for music.  Lin scale devotes too much resolution to higher frequencies, leaving lows without enough control.  I think it is very simple to learn how to use log scale analyzer, and it really worth it.

Sonic Finalizer also uses logarithmic dependency both for gain and threshold values.  Spectrum is divided during processing into equal parts log-scale wise.  Otherwise it won't work.


Thanks for your reply.  What I wanted to ask was completely different from Lin/Log topic.  OK let me explain from another angle.

If we analyze the same mix on hardware spectrum analyzer(based on bandpass filters with equal Q) and on soft spectrum analyzer(using spectrum resoluton of an FFT with equal bandwidth), we will see different curves, softly spoken.  The curve of soft analyzer will be slanted (-3db/octave) compare to the curve of hardware analyzer.  That is why many software developers implement '+3db' correction into their soft analyzers(for ex.  Waves' PAZ Analyzer, Audio-software' PAS Spectrum Analyzer).  Strictly speaking, the curve, CurveEQ shows, is actually the real one.  But, becauce of the energy of low end is much more higher than energy of high end the curve we see is always falling down.

So, what I am trying to say is we can see 'hills and valleys' on analyzer curve, but it is hard to judge the relationship between low end and high end from mix to mix during mastering.  My question was if it is possible to implement that kind of correction to make the view of spectral curve more horizontal.  Even more, you could make it change(for ex. +3, +4, +5...+9db/octave) thus any produser would be able to choose his type of 'linear curve', because the different type of music demands different curve.  I haven't met an analyzer, which has a feature like this.

Thanks,

Vitaly.


Good, thanks for the tip, I'll try to implement it.
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