Voxengo Premium Membership - All Voxengo Plugins For a Fixed One-Time Fee
Forums     Plugins     CurveEQ Default Capture Files

This topic was created before release of the latest product version, and it may contain details irrelevant to this version.  Replying is disabled for this topic.

Last

Next

Previous

First



Abnormal = inconsistencies and variances from true white noise (within the specified bandwidth).  Ok, I tend to be a perfectionist to a fault.  Penny wise and dollar foolish sometimes, chase the penny and miss the dollar floating by, but I really don't think that is the case here.

It turns out the generator white noise I have is only off a 1/2 db or so according to CurveEQ and Span, in the lower and upper mids referenced to the very low and very high frequencies.  However, as you well know, even tenths of a db over a good sized bandwidth can translate to a very substantial change in the overall sound.

I did use the "slope" setting of +3 and applied a curve to the white noise coming in to result in as much of a straight line on the graph as was possible for the resulting output, along with the attempted correction for that 1/2 db or so dip in the lower through upper mids.  I then processed the white noise to an output file I called "Pink Noise".  Lastly I ran the utility to capture the pink noise curve reference.

I do believe my results sound better with this pink noise source and capture file, than the other pink noise sources I've used so far, but it is all inherently error laden.  Some of the pink and white noise sources out there have some serious bumps and dips in them and my starting file has a broad dip.

This is working ok for what I am trying to do.


Please try using long white-noise files - 20-30 seconds, for example.  The more statistics is collected the smoother the response.

I did.  I used a reference white noise file that was 5 minutes long, and created a 5 minute long pink noise file.

The results are quite usable.  I am able to take the result, make a target file match that pink response and then start hacking away unnecessary stuff from the result and then making making character additions to the sound, or whatever is needed.

This is a very nice product.  I can make adjustments that are so much easier to do (once I got used to doing this on a graph), that are nearly impossible to construct with parametric eq's.  Too much of the incoming signal has to be "right" to begin with to use parametrics.  I don't always have that luxury when doing live recordings off of a stage.


I like using this technique myself and have been "pushing into the pink" using curve stealing for some time now.  It's a very quick way to get a remaster happening and the mids sounding very close to a good balance.  The bass and highs still need to be shelfed by hand but no big deal.  Cool technique!
This topic was created before release of the latest product version, and it may contain details irrelevant to this version.  Replying is disabled for this topic.

Last

Next

Previous

First