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Hello -

Someone recommended Soniformer as the best Voxengo tool to do that, what the subject says.  I was wondering, is there a simpler Voxengo plug-in that accomplishes the same goal?

Someone mentioned in another forum that GlissEQ isn't the right tool, they said it is not "surgical" enough.  Can someone tell me if they are doing just fine using that tool for that process?

Aliasing ... how much of an issue in Soniformer, GlissEQ?

Finally ... finding it hard to locate youtubes on Soniformer ... any links/pointers would be appreciated.

Thanks!


I own both Soniformer and GlissEQ, and have found that Soniformer is much more effective in taming mid-frequency harshness in choral performances as well as with soloists.  GlissEQ is much more subtle, and seems to be designed to provide a less clearly audible outcome - an injection of a kind of liveliness that may be preferable in some circumstances.  However, when your goal is the outright reduction of unwanted frequency bands exceeding specified levels, you need the right tool.

If I understand your concern about aliasing correctly, you're concerned about the generation of ultra-sonic compression artifacts.  If this is a factor, then place a lowpass filter after Soniformer in your signal chain.  Voxengo's own MEQ or Curve EQ would be suitable, but there are others that are purpose built for this situation out there in the world.

I have not seen any videos about Soniformer, but I have learned through trial and error, although in the three years I've owned it, I'm sure I'm only scratching the surface.  It's easy to overdo things with it, and I've had a few "what was I thinking" moments when I've reviewed a mix a day or two later.  The user interface is somewhat daunting, and you need to be precise with your mouse when placing break points/designing curves.  The best course seems to be to start out with tailoring your Threshold frequency response curve, while leaving the ratio and most/all others as flat, adjusting their values globally.  Remember that the "In Slope" setting will change the way the signal interacts with any curves you've drawn.

Frank Lockwood

Lockwood ARS - http://LockwoodARS.com

Quality music recording services for classical and acoustic music.

Toronto, ON, Canada

Host DAW: Merging Technologies' Pyramix 11.0.4 (64 bit) AND 9.1.10 (32 bit)

System: Windows 7 SP1 64 bit on Mac Mini (6.2) via Bootcamp 5.1.5621

Windows 7 SP1 32 bit on MacBook Pro (3.1) computer via Bootcamp 4.0.4033.

Curve EQ, Deft Compressor, Elephant, GlissEQ, HarmoniEQ, LF Max Punch, Polysquasher2, Polysquasher3, Soniformer, TransGainer, Voxformer; also Deconvolver.


Hello Frank -

Thank you so much for your kind reply!

I'm glad to get confirmation one way or another re: GlissEQ and for vocal dynamic EQng.  Too bad that one is off the list, I'm getting used to the Voxengo format from Curve EQ and SPAN.  I might just steer clear of Soniformer for now, being a home hobbyist it might be a little too much for me to take on at this time.

Thanks again - so kind of you to give your thoughts!

Alexis

PS Went to your website ... it's great!  I especially enjoyed the sound restoration section.  Nice work!


Thank you for the kind words about my website.  Voxengo plugins have been an integral part of my operation for the last three or four years - particularly Elephant, Curve EQ, and Soniformer (with GlissEQ occasionally, when it's suitable).

I really didn't mean for my reply to put you off Soniformer - it seems every time I record an amateur or semi-professional choir, I reach for it to get rid of some of the mid-frequency kchch that seems to develop when they start to sing loud (especially when they've all been consuming milk products and so have that nice, phlegmy sound).  I create a frequency curve for the Threshold, which is flat for the most part, with a dip between 1.4 and 2.5 kHz., or thereabouts, while leaving the compression ratio flat and simply dragging the line up or down to get the desired amount of reduction.  When I see the display showing little dips in that region during the louder passages, I know I've got it set right, although I'll continue to refine the frequency limits and the amount or reduction - which occasionally calls for some adjustment of the Slope.

Really, the hard work is finding the correct frequency range that I want treated, and then determining the amount of reduction so that the product continues to sound natural, just without all that nasty stuff that happens when the singing gets loud.  To date, I've never even touched any of the stereo adjusting parameters, so I suppose I still haven't fully utilized its capabilities, but for that one job, it really works better than anything else I've tried.

GlissEQ is interesting in that you often don't hear it working.  I was particularly intrigued when I examined some of the Factory pre-sets, which feature boosts AND cuts at the same frequencies, with the dynamic behaviour.  This introduces a less predictable outcome, which in turn can lend a certain interesting quality to some program material, without having its frequency response changed all that much.  It's rather subliminal in that regard.

Frank Lockwood

Lockwood ARS - http://LockwoodARS.com

Quality music recording services for classical and acoustic music.

Toronto, ON, Canada

Host DAW: Merging Technologies' Pyramix 11.0.4 (64 bit) AND 9.1.10 (32 bit)

System: Windows 7 SP1 64 bit on Mac Mini (6.2) via Bootcamp 5.1.5621

Windows 7 SP1 32 bit on MacBook Pro (3.1) computer via Bootcamp 4.0.4033.

Curve EQ, Deft Compressor, Elephant, GlissEQ, HarmoniEQ, LF Max Punch, Polysquasher2, Polysquasher3, Soniformer, TransGainer, Voxformer; also Deconvolver.


HI Frank -

Well, whichever plugin I settle on for dynamic EQ, I will use your *very* informational post as a "how-to" starting reference!

Thanks!

Alexis


Aliasing is mostly not an issue in both Soniformer and GlissEQ.  Aliasing may happen if you are using fast attack below 1 millisecond.
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