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Forums     Discussions     Announces, Releases and Discussions So - What's in the pipeline then Aleksey?


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Normally you are the hardest working man on the planet, and it seems strange there has been nothing new for so long now.

I therefore assume there is something tasty in the pipeline, and am wondering what it might be.

Any clues?

Anything multichannel yet?

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Yes, I understand your question.  Of course, I have something to release.  First of all, we have our first VST working on Mac OS X (tested in Tracktion 2).  Secondly, everything is starting to be in portable state - I'm slowly discontinuing using pure assembler as it is non-portable.  Another feature we have implemented is standard re-skinning and re-colouring plus UI scaling setting (very useful if you are using 1600x1200 resolution).  By the time the first VST is released using our new 'core SDK', we'll be able to offer VST2.4 plug-ins in both 32-bit and 64-bit CPU modes.

Beside that I'm reviewing all approaches to plug-in programming and audio processing.  Most of the plug-ins will be multi-channel from the very start - with stereo and multi-channel licenses on the offer.

So, this is a bit of a 'calm' period.  Things are not fading away - I'm just slowly moving to a new quality level.


Cool.

This is great news.

64 bit doesn't interest me, not for at least another 2 years.

When Vista gets to SP1 then, and only then (assuming Nuendo/WaveLab is 64 bit, and assuming the hardware I have is also 64 bit - and not the 32 bit "legacy" mode in x64 as it is less efficient than 32 bit FP currently available) will I go to 64 bit.

I know Vista just got pushed back to Q2 2007 due to massive memory issues.  Apparently it was pulling 800Mb RAM just to run the OS, and even something as basic as email pushed it well over the 1Gb level.  Vista betas need at least 2 Gb to even begin to run much, MS cannot sort it now so it's all been delayed.

But I digress...

will a multichannel license also work in Stereo - or will I need 2 versions?

www.opusproductions.com

Multichannel Audio Specialists

DVD-A, DVD-V Authoring

Mixing & Mastering to most formats


Actually, x64 always maked me wonder why it is needed at all.  I can understand multi-core processor progress.  Having more than 2GB for each application is a plus, of course, but then we'll need to increase speed of harddisk drives since loading 2 GB of data from the disk (e.g., samples) requires more than 1 minute in the best scenario.  This is still a bit marginal.  Anyway, if everyone goes that direction I'll have to go there, too.

Multi-channel license will support stereo processing of course.

BTW, it seems that Mac OS X may take a big chunk of Microsoft's market (like Mozilla Firefox browser did) - Mac OS X 10.4 is $129 - that can be competitive to MS XP Pro's $170 if Mac OS X manages to run on any PC hardware (it can do it already with some tweaks).  This is a pain for developers, but should balance PC OS market and put MS prices down a bit.


Aleksey Vaneev: Another feature we have implemented is standard re-skinning and re-colouring plus UI scaling setting (very useful if you are using 1600x1200 resolution)

sounds great! looking forward ...


Aleksey Vaneev: Actually, x64 always maked me wonder why it is needed at all.  I can understand multi-core processor progress.  Having more than 2GB for each application is a plus, of course, but then we'll need to increase speed of harddisk drives since loading 2 GB of data from the disk (e.g., samples) requires more than 1 minute in the best scenario.  This is still a bit marginal.  Anyway, if everyone goes that direction I'll have to go there, too.

Yes - it is definitely worthwhile for people with big drum/piano/orchestral libraries to be able to load up many gigs of data BUT they do take a while to load up.  Even if you have your data spread over three drives (eg drums on one, piano on another, strings on a third) programs like Cubase SX seem to load one instrument at a time.  Since we have multi-tasking OSs and multi-core processors this seems a bit lame - perhaps when there is sufficient memory available loading will also be streamlined.

Anyway, good to hear of all these developments Aleksey :-)


There's a solution to that limitation - RAID zero array.  I'm running one right now, with 4 hard disks.  It gives 84 MB of constant read speed as far as I know.  So, reading 2 GB is faster than 1 minute, but is still pretty long.  I have another hard disk array which gives 150 MB of constant read speed (based on 15.000 RPM Western Digital Raptors hard disks), but this computer is too noisy for music making.

In regard to 64 bit, Joe Bryant of Universal Audio had this to say about the somewhat dubious benefits:

64 bit problems

Win64 supports two application modes: 32-bit (for compatability), and 64-bit.  If an app is compiled to run in 64-bit mode, it can't load 32-bit plugins or add-ons.  Also, since there's no x87 FPU in 64-bit mode, all the floating point code must be reworked to run on the vector units.  So for example, if a plugin has optimized assembly code (like most good native plugs), these have to be completely rewritten to work in 64-bit mode on the new floating point hardware!  Some plugins may already have been written to use the vector units (like some synths and impulse 'verbs), so these would port more easily assuming the vector code is the only low-level assembly code.

As appealing as 64-bit mode is, the sonic benefits simply aren't there.  In fact, the internal precision of the vector units is lower than the x87 FPU!  The vector units can process 32- and 64-bit floats, but their internal resolution is fixed at the same precision.  The x87 FPU on the other hand, always retains 80- or 160-bit internal prescion, and only drops the precision when results are saved to memory.  Also, when 64-bit precision is used in the vector unit, performance is cut in half, so intensive 64-bit float code will be slower than 32-bit code.

The bottom line is that because of the availability of this more efficient, but lower resolution 32-bit float mode in Win64, some plugin vendors may opt to drop precision when supporting 64-bit application mode, and sound quality will be lower than what's currently available in the current 32-bit mode.

More can sometimes be less!

www.opusproductions.com

Multichannel Audio Specialists

DVD-A, DVD-V Authoring

Mixing & Mastering to most formats


Neil, I'm not confident that precision may drop down so much.  Nor I think calculation speeds with 64-bit floats will be slow.  Sonar reported 30% speed-up in Windows 64 - that means something considering mixing apps like Sonar rely on floating point unit.  BTW, there's no '160-bit internal resolution' on x86 CPUs.  80-bit resolution is indeed there, but it is retained on small calculation segments only.  In average, it is still 64-bit floats.  This is more than adequate for sound processing, really.

It's not my words!

x87 CPU is what it seems Joe is talking about though, not x86 - although I do not really know.

www.opusproductions.com

Multichannel Audio Specialists

DVD-A, DVD-V Authoring

Mixing & Mastering to most formats

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